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Starts with: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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Starts with: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

On June 14, 2013, Theresa Anderson from the Urban Institute led a webinar discussing some of the early evaluation findings, including the results of the college survey.PLEASE NOTE: there was a miscalculation in the slides used in the recording; the cost per student discussed in slide 30 should be $4,546. The slides posted here have been updated with the correct amount.

Streaming recording link:
https://jff.webex.com/jff/ldr.php?AT=pb&SP=MC&rID=26465547&rKey=5a8dedb829e8d685

Download recording link:
https://jff.webex.com/jff/ldr.php?AT=pb&SP=MC&rID=26465547&rKey=99eb06d693e5c591

PowerPoint:
Due to the file size, the PowerPoint is in two parts.
Part I
Part II

2013
Theresa Anderson
Urban Institute & Jobs for the Future

March 7, 2013

This webinar was for Arkansas colleges interested in taking part in Accelerating Opportunity. In 2013, Arkansas joined Accelerating Opportunity as an Affiliate Network state; four colleges will take part in a six-month design phase, with the goal of moving into a longer-term implementation phase. This webinar is an overview of the initiative and what Accelerating Opportunity will look like in Arkansas; in particular, how it will weave together this model and the state's existing Career Pathways Initiative.

Presenters:
Mike Leach, Arkansas Association of Two-Year Colleges
Karon Rosa, Arkansas Career Pathways, Arkansas Department of Higher Education
Jim Smith, Arkansas Adult Education
Barbara Endel, Jobs for the Future

Streaming recording link:
https://jff.webex.com/jff/lsr.php?AT=dw&SP=MC&rID=25767242&rKey=935053f7842d287d
Download recording link:
https://jff.webex.com/jff/ldr.php?AT=pb&SP=MC&rID=25767242&rKey=dc9ee9a8dfa55de0

Powerpoint

RFP

2013
Mike Leach, Karon Rosa, Jim Smith, Barbara Endel
Jobs for the Future, Arkansas Association of Two-Year Colleges

To become a true agent for change, you need to articulate key messages to a wide variety of stakeholders.  But just knowing the messages is not enough. You must be able to reach the right audiences that can impact change. Learn how to reach both internal (faculty, students, administrators) and external (policymakers, business leaders, media) audiences with your specific messages and share your own experiences about what has worked, and what hasn’t.

2012
Jobs for the Future
Jobs for the Future

Accelerating Opportunity online professional development opportunities include self-paced tutorials and courses facilitated by experienced specialists that are aimed at strengthening the skills needed to build an integrated basic skills career pathways model. The National College Transition Network (NCTN) at World Education, Inc. created these courses in collaboration with Jobs for the Future, Washington State Board of Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC), and Minnesota FastTRAC. For additional tools and resources, please visit Accelerating Opportunity's Virtual Academy.

Visit the website for information, including course descriptions, schedules, fees, and how to register. Please read the Online Course Policies for facilitated courses and the Minimum Technical Requirements information.

Courses Available:

  • Team Teaching - Models and Practice
  • Team Teaching an Integrated Curriculum to Accelerate Learning
  • Finding True North - Role of the Navigator 
  • Navigating Pathways to Opportunity 
  • Promoting Engagement - Role of the Administrator
  • Building Accelerating Opportunities Pathways

 

2012
The National College Transition Network at World Education, Jobs for the Future, Washington State Board of Comunity and Technical Colleges, and Minnesota FastTRAC
The National College Transition Network at World Education

This first-look report from the Center for Community College Student Engagement (CCCSE) focuses on student success, addressing efforts from students’ first interaction with a college, to helping them through the first year. It describes promising educational practices for which there is emerging evidence of success: research from the field and from multiple colleges with multiple semesters of data showing improvement on an array of metrics, such as course completion, retention, and graduation. The report also identifies a set of design principles which are critical for student success:

  • A strong start. Making sure students’ earliest contact and first weeks in college include experiences that build personal connections and improve their chances of success, the guide says.
  • Clear, coherent pathways. Students face many choices as they weave through college systems, which can be confusing and serve as barriers to students’ success.
  • Integrated support. Building support such as skills development and extra instruction into coursework rather than referring students to services that not part of the learning experience improves success.
  • High expectations and high support. Set a high standard for students and give them the supports to reach them through services such as academic planning and financial aid.
  • Intensive student engagement. Promoting student engagement is the overarching feature of successful program design, the guide says.
  • Design for scale. Successful endeavors require time, money, political and financial support, as well as the involvement of faculty, staff and students.
  • Professional development. Instructors, staff, faculty, administrators and governing boards must all re-evaluate their roles and work differently to foster student success.

 

2012
Center for Community College Student Engagement
Center for Community College Student Engagement

This searchable database contains expert-identified and vetted research and planning documents to support Completion by Design colleges through the planning, decision making, and implementation stages.

2012
Completion by Design

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, the Competency Model Clearinghouse provides validated industry competency models and tools to build a custom model and career ladder/lattice for your industry.

Industry competency models promote an understanding of the skill sets and competencies that are essential to educate and train a globally competitive workforce.

2012
U. S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration

“Moving Low-Skill SNAP Recipients Toward Self-Sufficiency,” a publication from the National Skills Coalition, is designed to help the workforce field better understand Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment & Training (SNAP E&T, formerly the Food Stamp Employment & Training or FSET program).

First established in 1985, SNAP E&T is one of the few federally-supported programs specifically designed to provide employment and training services to extremely low-skilled, low-income adults. Each state is required to operate a SNAP E&T program, though they have considerable discretion in the types of services that may be offered (including job search assistance, work experience, and job training) and the types of SNAP participants to be served.

In recent years, a number of states have begun to recognize the value of SNAP E&T in connecting SNAP recipients with meaningful education and training opportunities leading to industry-recognized degrees and credentials with value in the labor market. States have used SNAP E&T funds to support innovative partnerships with community colleges, community-based organizations and other stakeholders, and have successfully used SNAP E&T funding to leverage additional non-federal public and private resources. However, many states and workforce system partners remain confused about who may be served, and what services can be provided, which has likely limited the growth of SNAP E&T programs on a national level.

By offering a basic overview of the program and highlighting certain issues that are important to consider when designing or implementing an E&T component, this guide is meant to help begin addressing some of these issues for the field. It provides an introduction to the administrative structures, participant eligibility requirements, and funding mechanisms under SNAP E&T, as well as an overview of key program elements that can help ensure SNAP recipients are receiving the full range of training and supportive services necessary for success in the labor market. The guide also highlights examples of how states are using SNAP E&T to help low-skilled individuals find jobs in high-demand industries, and addresses unique issues facing partnerships between state agencies and community colleges. The goal of this publication is to help ensure that SNAP participants have access to high-quality employment and training services that help them gain the necessary skills to obtain stable, family-supporting employment.

2012
National Skills Coalition

This one-pager, updated June 2012, provides an overview of the initiative.

2012
Jobs for the Future