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Support Services

Strategies to better support students overcome barriers to success and persist through completion of a credential.

The annual Fall Technical Institute is an opportunity for Breaking Through and Accelerating Opportunity state teams to receive targeted TA on a variety of topics. For this meeting, JFF recruited 18 subject matter experts from across the country to help state teams work through complex issues such as sustainability planning, employer engagement, and building comprehensive support services. Nine state teams attended this year's Institute.

Meeting Objectives 

  • Provide state teams with targeted technical assistance designed to strengthen solutions, advance the work, and meet outcomes through structured interactions with subject matter experts.
  • Enable teams to exchange effective practices and understand how other states or colleges are addressing key issues through peer sharing opportunities.
  • Ensure that teams leave the Institute with specific actions and plans to further their implementation and sustainability efforts.
Jobs for the Future

Thursday, September 13th, 2:00 PM EDT

Support services are a critical part of the AO model. While there isn’t necessarily a perfect prescription for support services, there are definitely some ways to standardize what’s offered across colleges. In this webinar we discussed about how supports are being offered, and the way that systems and colleges can create structures that promote successful, sustainable models for providing student supports.  

Moderator: Sandy Goodman, NCTN.

Guest Experts: 
Judy Mortrude and Nola Speiser, Minnesota FastTRAC: Judy and Nola shared how Minnesota has established a single point of contact for students and the state and college structures that have made that model successful. Nola also talked about her experiences as a Navigator and how she was able to make connections across agencies to better serve her students.

Download PowerPoint

Links to Professional Development Resources for Navigators/Support Services Staff
 
 
 
 

Streaming recording link:
https://jff.webex.com/jff/ldr.php?AT=pb&SP=MC&rID=24611547&rKey=ae6730c6df16ee9c

Download recording link:
https://jff.webex.com/jff/lsr.php?AT=dw&SP=MC&rID=24611547&rKey=b8fc534a6ede3240

2012
Sandy Goodman, Judy Mortrude, Nola Speiser
National College Transtion Network, Minnesota FastTRAC

Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I-BEST) integrates the teaching of basic skills and technical content in order to accelerate basic skills students’ transition into and through a college-level occupational field of study.

The study reported on here represents the final phase of a multi-year evaluation of the I-BEST model that began in 2009, conducted by CCRC in collaboration with MPR Associates and the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. Based on fieldwork undertaken in spring 2011 on 16 I-BEST programs at eight colleges, this report builds on CCRC’s earlier qualitative and quantitative research by seeking to understand those aspects of I-BEST that best support student learning, progression, and completion.

In addition, the report considers the I-BEST student experience and presents the results of a cost-benefit analysis of the program. The findings and recommendations highlighted in the report will be of interest to funders, policymakers, and practitioners in other states who are considering transition interventions similar to the I-BEST model.

2012
John Wachen, Davis Jenkins, Clive Belfield, and Michelle Van Noy with Amanda Richards and Kristen Kulongoski
The Community Collge Research Center, Teachers College, Columbia University

The Adult College Completion Toolkit was developed by the Department of Education’s Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE). OVAE developed the Toolkit to help policymakers at the state and local level implement practical evidence-based solutions that increase the number of graduates who earn high-quality degrees and certificates required to compete for good jobs in the 21st century global economy. College completion is a shared responsibility; this Toolkit also provides resources for adult education administrators, teachers, and students.

The Adult College Completion Tool Kit is designed to connect state administrators and local practitioners to the strategies, resources, and technical assistance tools resulting from the Department’s work. States can use this information to identify and implement state adult education leadership priorities, supported by federal Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) funds, which encourage and support adult learners transitioning to college.

The tool kit focuses on three areas:

  • Access: Academic preparation, financial resources, and other support students need to enroll in postsecondary education programs.
  • Quality: Evidence-based practices used by programs to ensure their services prepare students adequately for postsecondary education.
  • Completion: Administrative policies and programmatic approaches to encourage student persistence in postsecondary education programs.
2012
Michelle Tolbert, MPR Associates, Inc.,
U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education

Jobs for the Future works with districts, states, national youth-serving networks, intermediaries, and community colleges to reengage youth who are off track to graduation or out of school and put them on a path to postsecondary success. 

In serving this population, Back on Track was developed to reengage off-track and out-of-school youth by creating clear pathways into and through postsecondary credentials. We develop and scale these designs with districts, states, national youth-serving networks, intermediaries and community colleges.

To assist its partners in this work, JFF offers a comprehensive range of services, tools, and resources.

 
2012
Jobs for the Future
Jobs for the Future

In Summer 2010, Workforce Strategy Center (WSC) conducted a survey to determine the proliferation of bridge programs throughout the country. With generous support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, WSC now digs deeper into bridge programs to further advance the workforce development field. Moving beyond the BridgeConnect report, WSC set out to study how these programs work to position low-skilled, low-wealth populations for success.

This report is aimed at bridge program practitioners whom WSC hopes will learn from the promising practices highlighted. Policymakers will benefit from learning how these programs are working on the ground to effectively bridge individuals into postsecondary credentials that lead to careers. The report also includes video clips that capture practitioner and participant emotions and personalities. 

2011
Workforce Strategy Center
Workforce Strategy Center

Through Courses to Employment AspenWSI investigated the operations and outcomes of six partnerships between nonprofit organizations and community colleges. These types of partnerships represent a nascent field of practice, and nonprofit and community college representatives have noted time and again the value of sharing ideas, strategies and information about the nuts and bolts work of organizing and managing effective partnerships.

AspenWSI has compiled a variety of different types of tools that partnerships have used to support their work on the ground. The tools available today reflect a work-in-progress, and we expect to add additional tools over time. We welcome comments, feedback and suggestions for additions. The tools are organized in three categories:

How do partners organize themselves? Who does what?

What strategies do partners use to provide education and support services?

What kinds of costs are involved in partnership?

2012
Courses to Employment
Workforce Strategies Initiative at the Urban Institute

The Career Pathways Toolkit: Six Key Elements for Success was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration’s Career Pathways Initiative to help guide state and local leaders in building and sustaining career pathway systems. This Toolkit offers a clear and user-friendly road map for administrators, service providers, practitioners, and policy makers seeking to develop career pathway systems at local, regional, and/or state levels. It details the Six Key Elements Framework, highlights promising practices, and provides tools designed to support visioning and strategic planning.

2011
Social Policy Research Associates
Developed on behalf of the U.S. Department of Labor by Social Policy Research Associates

This searchable database contains expert-identified and vetted research and planning documents to support Completion by Design colleges through the planning, decision making, and implementation stages.

2012
Completion by Design

This first-look report from the Center for Community College Student Engagement (CCCSE) focuses on student success, addressing efforts from students’ first interaction with a college, to helping them through the first year. It describes promising educational practices for which there is emerging evidence of success: research from the field and from multiple colleges with multiple semesters of data showing improvement on an array of metrics, such as course completion, retention, and graduation. The report also identifies a set of design principles which are critical for student success:

  • A strong start. Making sure students’ earliest contact and first weeks in college include experiences that build personal connections and improve their chances of success, the guide says.
  • Clear, coherent pathways. Students face many choices as they weave through college systems, which can be confusing and serve as barriers to students’ success.
  • Integrated support. Building support such as skills development and extra instruction into coursework rather than referring students to services that not part of the learning experience improves success.
  • High expectations and high support. Set a high standard for students and give them the supports to reach them through services such as academic planning and financial aid.
  • Intensive student engagement. Promoting student engagement is the overarching feature of successful program design, the guide says.
  • Design for scale. Successful endeavors require time, money, political and financial support, as well as the involvement of faculty, staff and students.
  • Professional development. Instructors, staff, faculty, administrators and governing boards must all re-evaluate their roles and work differently to foster student success.

 

2012
Center for Community College Student Engagement
Center for Community College Student Engagement