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credentials

Certificates have swelled to become the second most common postsecondary award in the U.S.: Over 1 million are awarded each year. In the context of concerns about rising college costs and student loan debt, certificates, which are cheaper and take less time to complete than college degrees, have become of increasing interest to researchers, institutions, and other stakeholders in higher education.

In this report, Anthony P. Carnevale, Stephen J. Rose, and Andrew R. Hanson of the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University analyze earnings by field of study, sex, race/ethnicity, and program length. One of the most important factors that affects earnings is whether certificate holders work in the same occupational field they studied in.

The authors also take a close look at the demographic characteristics of certificate holders: sex, race/ethnicity, age, educational attainment, academic preparation/skill, family income, and parents' education.

Last, the authors analyze the institutions that most commonly award certificates—such as community colleges and for-profit institutions—and the states where certificates are most prevalent and provide the highest earnings returns.

2012
Anthony P. Carnevale, Stephen J. Rose, and Andrew R. Hanson
Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce

In Summer 2010, Workforce Strategy Center (WSC) conducted a survey to determine the proliferation of bridge programs throughout the country. With generous support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, WSC now digs deeper into bridge programs to further advance the workforce development field. Moving beyond the BridgeConnect report, WSC set out to study how these programs work to position low-skilled, low-wealth populations for success.

This report is aimed at bridge program practitioners whom WSC hopes will learn from the promising practices highlighted. Policymakers will benefit from learning how these programs are working on the ground to effectively bridge individuals into postsecondary credentials that lead to careers. The report also includes video clips that capture practitioner and participant emotions and personalities. 

2011
Workforce Strategy Center
Workforce Strategy Center

The purpose of this Credential Resource Guide is to provide information on the types of credentials available to workforce program participants and explain how they can acquire and leverage these credentials to build lasting careers. This resource guide is organized into five sections.

  • Section 1 - Defining Credentials
  • Section 2 - Understanding Credentials 
  • Section 3 - Tools for Identifying Credentials
  • Section 4 - Acquiring and Leveraging Credentials 
  • Section 5 - Current Models of Industry-Recognized Stackable Credentials
2011
U. S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, the Competency Model Clearinghouse provides validated industry competency models and tools to build a custom model and career ladder/lattice for your industry.

Industry competency models promote an understanding of the skill sets and competencies that are essential to educate and train a globally competitive workforce.

2012
U. S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration

The U.S. economy will emerge from the Great Recession radically transformed from what it was a generation ago. Changes are afoot affecting which occupations and industry sectors will produce employment growth, as well as what education credentials, competencies, and skills will be required to do those jobs.

Community colleges already take steps to address the workforce needs of local employers, but their efforts often are hampered by a lack of detailed, up-to-date information about occupations and skills in demand. A promising, yet still-evolving solution to that problem can be found within the large pool of job openings posted on the Internet.

This paper discusses new sophisticated “spidering” and artificial intelligence technologies that can aggregate and analyze these online job ads and provide a more comprehensive, “real-time” source of information about the hiring and skill needs of local employers. If proven accurate and reliable, analyses of online job ads could complement traditional ways that community colleges determine labor market demand for program and course offerings.

2011
David Altstadt
Jobs for the Future

This Policy Brief focuses on helping adults with lower skills and/ or limited English proficiency earn postsecondary credentials that open doors to family-supporting jobs. It examines obstacles to moving toward this goal -- with major attention to lack of alignment between federal and state adult education efforts, job training services, and postsecondary education policies.

2007
Julie Strawn
Center for Law and Social Policy