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The Resource Library is a compendium of tools and resources selected specifically for the Accelerating Opportunity initiative. You can navigate the Resource Library by topic, or by key word (or tag).

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college transition

The Policy to Performance Toolkit is designed to provide state adult education staff and key stakeholders with guidance and tools to use in developing, implementing, and monitoring state policies and their associated practices that support effective state ABE to postsecondary transition systems. The Policy to Performance Toolkit is based on the processes and findings from the Policy to Performance Project. The tools and practices utilized in the project were compiled into a comprehensive and interactive Toolkit that provides users with guidance and strategies for strengthening existing or developing new ABE state transition (STET) The Policy to Performance Toolkit offers users downloadable resources and writable tools, as well as provides examples of how participating states applied the tools and processes discussed in the Toolkit.

2012
Judith A. Alamprese & Chrys Limardo
Kratos Learning and Abt Associates Inc.

Minnesota FastTRAC (Training, Resources, and Credentialing) seeks to make Minnesota more competitive by meeting the common skills needs of businesses and individuals.

FastTRAC’s innovative approach helps educationally underprepared adults succeed in well-paying careers by integrating basic skills education and career-specific training in fields where new skills are in high demand. By focusing on high-demand fields, FastTRAC meets the needs of business while ensuring that students find well-paying jobs with room for advancement.

2012
Minnesota FastTRAC Initiative

Jobs for the Future works with districts, states, national youth-serving networks, intermediaries, and community colleges to reengage youth who are off track to graduation or out of school and put them on a path to postsecondary success. 

In serving this population, Back on Track was developed to reengage off-track and out-of-school youth by creating clear pathways into and through postsecondary credentials. We develop and scale these designs with districts, states, national youth-serving networks, intermediaries and community colleges.

To assist its partners in this work, JFF offers a comprehensive range of services, tools, and resources.

 
2012
Jobs for the Future
Jobs for the Future

The Career Pathways Toolkit: Six Key Elements for Success was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration’s Career Pathways Initiative to help guide state and local leaders in building and sustaining career pathway systems. This Toolkit offers a clear and user-friendly road map for administrators, service providers, practitioners, and policy makers seeking to develop career pathway systems at local, regional, and/or state levels. It details the Six Key Elements Framework, highlights promising practices, and provides tools designed to support visioning and strategic planning.

2011
Social Policy Research Associates
Developed on behalf of the U.S. Department of Labor by Social Policy Research Associates

This first-look report from the Center for Community College Student Engagement (CCCSE) focuses on student success, addressing efforts from students’ first interaction with a college, to helping them through the first year. It describes promising educational practices for which there is emerging evidence of success: research from the field and from multiple colleges with multiple semesters of data showing improvement on an array of metrics, such as course completion, retention, and graduation. The report also identifies a set of design principles which are critical for student success:

  • A strong start. Making sure students’ earliest contact and first weeks in college include experiences that build personal connections and improve their chances of success, the guide says.
  • Clear, coherent pathways. Students face many choices as they weave through college systems, which can be confusing and serve as barriers to students’ success.
  • Integrated support. Building support such as skills development and extra instruction into coursework rather than referring students to services that not part of the learning experience improves success.
  • High expectations and high support. Set a high standard for students and give them the supports to reach them through services such as academic planning and financial aid.
  • Intensive student engagement. Promoting student engagement is the overarching feature of successful program design, the guide says.
  • Design for scale. Successful endeavors require time, money, political and financial support, as well as the involvement of faculty, staff and students.
  • Professional development. Instructors, staff, faculty, administrators and governing boards must all re-evaluate their roles and work differently to foster student success.

 

2012
Center for Community College Student Engagement
Center for Community College Student Engagement

Less than 5 percent of GED holders ever earn a postsecondary degree. In response, innovative GED programs have begun creating clear, effective pathways to postsecondary education, preparing their students for college and careers.

This white paper by John Garvey and JFF’s Terry Grobe shares lessons from “best in class” GED to College programs that show early, positive results in preparing youth for college and helping them persist once there. It also explores key issues connected to the growth of this programming within the field and lays out a framework for leaders and program staff looking to transform short-term GED programs into more intensive, college-connected designs.

2011
John Garvey, with Terry Grobe
Jobs for the Future

This report is a follow-up to California’s Basic Skills as a Foundation for Student Success initiative and provides an overview of practices and strategies for transitioning adult education students to postsecondary education. A series of literature reviews began in 2007 with the publication of Basic Skills as a Foundation for Student Success in California Community College (Center for Student Success, 2007). This report is one of a number of follow-up projects to the initial literature review.
The report begins with an overview of educational levels and enrollment of students in adult education, GED, and community colleges.  The author discusses advantages of additional educational achievement, the role of community colleges in serving adult education students, and the importance of collaboration among adult education and community colleges.
Strategies and practices in transitioning students from adult education to postsecondary education were identified and are described in four areas:  organizational and administrative practices; program component practices; staff development practices; and instructional practices.  Practices and models from adult education programs throughout the United States provide practitioners with an array of strategies and examples that could be implemented in adult education and community colleges.

2009
Sharon Seymour
Research and Planning Group for California Community Colleges/Center for Student Success

This report was developed as part of the Postsecondary Success initiative funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The paper provides a summary and analysis of promising policies and practices that could be beneficial in helping adults advance from adult education to postsecondary education. Data were collected by telephone interviews with 17 state adult education directors, postsecondary staff, and 1 – 2 program directors that were recommended by the state director.
The report summarizes and describes findings in the following categories:

  • Planning and partnerships
  • Models of college and career readiness
  • Assessment and advising
  • Comprehensive supports
  • Acceleration strategies
  • Funding mechanisms
  • Youth-specific issues and models.

The paper begins with an overview of adult education college and career readiness efforts and includes a particular focus on youth in adult education, ages 16 to 24. In addition to basic skills instruction, most adults, regardless of age, could benefit from college and career readiness services by helping them prepare for postsecondary education. The author describes a multitude of approaches taken by participating states in providing these services and also discusses challenges and opportunities that emerged in planning for and implementing the services. In addition to stating that the adult education system reform efforts should include a shift and expansion "beyond the GED", the author provides recommendations for learners of all ages in adult education programs and closes by discussing youth-specific issues and approaches to developing and implementing youth-focused programs in 4 of the 17 states. The recommendations for adult education leaders and private and public funders are framed around partnerships, strategies, and needed research.

2010
Cynthia Zafft
National College Transition Network

This article examines the role counseling plays in adult learner transitions from adult education programs to postsecondary education. In recent years, there has been a growth in the research on adult learner transitions to postsecondary education. In this brief, the research findings and recommendations are shared on the role of counselors in successfully transitioning adult learners to postsecondary education and ensuring they are successful in meeting their educational goals of entering postsecondary education.

2011
Cherise G. Moore, Ph.D.
California Adult Literacy Professional Development Project

The Guide was developed by the Massachusetts Dept. of Adult and Secondary Education, the System for Adult Basic Education Support, and several Mass practitioners, with technical assistance from the Center for Applied Linguistics.  The Guide provides teachers with sample activities to use in their classrooms to help ESOL students develop the skills and knowledge they need to achieve their "next steps" employment, academic, or life skills goals.  This resource is NOT a list of skills, of which there are many examples, but a resource that translates those skills into interesting classroom activities.
 
The Guide is actually three guides, one each for Basic (SPLs 0-3), Intermediate (SPLs 4-5), and Advanced (SPL 6) ESOL learners.  The Guide developers felt strongly that even Basic Level ESOL students can practice next steps skills in the classroom.  While this resource was especially designed for ESOL learners, the activities can be easily adapted for ABE and Transitions students as well.
 
The Guide is available in PDF but also in Rich Text Format, so that teachers can isolate particular activities, add new ones, or amend those that are provided.  The RFT version also allows teachers to tailor listed activities for whole classes, groups of students working together, or an individual student.
 

2011
The System for Adult Basic Education Support (SABES) and the Center for Applied Linguistics
Massachusetts Deptartment of Adult and Secondary Education